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Learning to Animate My Own Cartoon! | SPIRIT RIDING FREE PRESENTS IZZY CREATES A CARTOON


– Hey there! Sorry, I’m on a huge deadline. I’m finishing my cartoon! It just doesn’t feel
finished though. I have the drawings, the voices, but I’m missing something. Oh, duh, it’s not moving! I gotta find out how you
actually animate the thing! Someone around here
can probably teach me how to animate in
about five minutes. (upbeat music) Hey, Daisy! I wrote the script, I’ve created the characters
and I’ve recorded my voice. But how do I make it move? – That’s awesome! Well you need to learn how
to make some storyboards. You need to talk to Josh Taback, he’s our Supervising Director. – Cool, thanks! (horses neighing) – Hi, I’m Izzy. – Hey, Izzy, how you doing? – Good. So what is a storyboard? – A storyboard is our
show done in pictures. One idea at a time. – So why do we do storyboards? – We do story boards so we can plan everything
that happens visually so someone watching
can tell happens and it all makes sense. And then when that’s
given to the animators they have a guide to know what
they’re supposed to be doing so all they have to
worry about is animating. And something like this where
our designs are given to us with various angles, so
where we can see everything and then what we do is, we have, once we have our script we start deciding what
the cameras get to see. Now there’s not an actual camera because everything’s either
drawn or in the computer so the camera’s in our head. And when we draw Lucky’s
hair for the storyboards we can be kinda
general with things. It doesn’t have to be
exact when you’re doing especially a computer
animated show. You just have to
get close enough that all the shapes are close to what the final
animation’s gonna look like. – So the animator can
interpret and understand what you drew. So they do what you did
and then enhance it, as opposed to
changing what you did. So with all the classes and all the art
school that I took I think about all
things I leaned there And I kind of, as quickly as I can I go in and I don’t make it too clean. We always say make
it clear, not clean. And this is from where
the PALs meet the BUDs. (horse neighing)
– I’m Prue. This is Chica Linda. – And I’m, who am I again? – This is Abigail. (horse neighing) And Boomerang. Come on PALs, let’s unpack. – PALs? – It’s a nickname
we call ourselves because those are our initials and because we’re friends. – What a coincidence. We also have a nickname
made of our initials. – Let me guess! You
call yourselves the DUBs because those are your initials and DUBs is short for W which is the first letter
in the word wonderful! – No. But interesting guess. – We call ourselves the BUDs. – All right. So I think you’re ready to
try your first storyboard. – Thank you so much! – [Josh] You’re very welcome. – Hey, Daisy! – Oh! Hi Izzy. – I’ve learned all
about storyboards but how do I animate it? – That’s super cool! Lets go talk to Jack Kasprzak. He’s our CG Animation Director. – Thanks! (upbeat music) – Hi! I’m Izzy. – Hi, I’m Jack. – Nice to meet you. – Nice to meet you. – So what do you do
on Sprit Riding Free? – I am the CG
Animation Supervisor. – Okay. What is that exactly? – Well, traditionally the
way cartoons used to be made is they were drawn in by hand. Frame by frame. But now a lot of shows
are what’s called CG. And that’s a 3D version where
we build a digital puppets. And so I supervise that process. – Cool! So I’m actually
making my own cartoon and I’ve already
made my storyboard but how do I animate it? – Perfect. Yes, that’s
right where we pick up. So the first thing
you need to do is go from the design phase where you have a design
of your characters and then we do what
we call a 3D model. It’s sort of a digital puppet. And then we give it a what’s called a rig and that’s the actual system that allows the
character to move. And so in this case we have Pru who’s been modeled in 3D and allows us to move
her around and pose her. So you’ll do everything from the individual poses, to the mouth shapes,
to the blinking. So one of the shots
we have here is we have Abigail and Pru have
just fallen down a mountain in a mudslide. So then we go into a
compositing program. So we’ll have out set layer here and you have your set lighting. And then when you
combine them you have a color that also has
true to life light. And to make our world
feel more expansive we have background
paintings like skies, we have this
background mountain, and as you combine them you slowly build this
depth of this scene. – Oh cool! – And then when you
layer it all together we do some final touch
up, add some dust and there’s the final shot. A lot of work! (laughs) – (laughs) Okay, it sounds
like I need an animator. – I think Dreamworks TV was gonna hook you
up with an animator. – Oh that’s great! (horse neighing)
(horse galloping) (theatrical music)
And now the premier of my cartoon! The Day My Family Became Horses. By Me! Izzy Newman. Doo-de-doo.
(birds chirping) Just a normal day
in the life of Izzy. (alarm clock ringing) Smash! (sink shattering) What the? Those don’t
look like my hands! (dramatic music) Aaah! (hooves clattering) Mom! Dad! I woke
up and I’m a horse! Oh no!
(horses chewing) (horse neighing)
Well, good luck with that. I’ve gotta get to school! (bus brakes squealing) (bus doors squeaking) – No horse allowed on the bus! Get lost! – But how am I
gonna get to school? (bell dinging) Wait a sec. I have horse power! (William Tell Overture) (horse hooves clattering) – [Children] Oh Cool! (school bell ringing) – I’m almost at class! Outta the way! Outta the way! I can’t slow down! (horse hooves skidding) Uh, sorry! (teacher wailing) Well, my teacher took a sick day but at least I got
to school on time! Thanks for watching! So whatcha think? – Greaty job, Izzy! – Thanks. So, are you guys like, hiring? – Why don’t you give a call, maybe when you’ve
graduated high school. – Deal! – Sweet. – Well, I hope you
like my cartoon. And now that you know
how to make a cartoon you should make on too. Or just watch cartoons. I mean, watching
is the best part. Actually that’s what
I’m gonna go do now. Okay! Bye!

Yvette Parker

13 Comments

  1. This doesn’t explain how one can make an animation by themselves but it does go over some really essential stuff

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